Sarah Hathway

The defeat of the right-wing Scott Morrison government indicates people want change and there is a strong mood to act on the climate crisis and inequality

Photo: Victorian Allied Health Professionals Association/Facebook

The new exemptions to Public Health Orders which can force sick workers to work represent a serious attack on workers' rights and their health and safety. Workers and our unions need to draw a line.

Australia: Climate pariah

The lesson from the G20 and COP26 is that it is not enough to just change an extreme climate foot dragging government for a seemingly climate friendly, big talking, but small action capitalist alternative.

Lockdown requires income support

Even though different state governments are taking slightly different approaches, the reason for this debate is that governments — state and federal — are making corporate interests a higher priority than people’s health.

Attorney general Christian Porter and Prime Minister Scott Morrison have tried their hardest to confuse, rather than address, the issues surrounding the credible allegations of rape against Porter.

The federal government’s commitment to a gas-led recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, supported by the Labor opposition, means that Australia is on track to reach net zero emissions in 300 years.

Young hospitality workers seeking their rights are up against attacks by bosses and the media

Behind the “We’re all in this together” rhetoric, it seems clear that employers and the government were not going to waste a crisis; they saw the talks as an opportunity to weaken industrial relations laws they judge to be “holding back” the economy.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison currently earns $538,460 a year and in a few weeks time will earn an additional $10,000 a year.

Geelong Council needs a couple of socialists to really shake things up.

Students say report "confirms what we’ve known for decades: that a culture of rape has become endemic through the inaction of universities."

The need for system change was a recurring discussion throughout this year's Students of Sustainability (SOS) conference. Conference participants were enthusiastic about practical next steps, wanting to know what they could do when they went back to their home towns, cities or campuses.

Deakin Uni student activist Sarah Hathway argues that free tertiary education can be provided for via a progressive taxation system that sees the individually wealthy and corporations pay their fair share of tax.

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