Nationalisation

The mining industry in Australia has boomed from about 4% of GDP in 2004 to about 9% today. Mining exports in the year to March last year were worth $155 billion, or 53% of Australia's total exports.

The rich get richer and the poor get poorer, yet both the Abbott government and the so-called opposition try to place the blame for falling living standards on refugees, Aboriginal people, welfare recipients and the poor and marginalised.

Not a week, nor even a day, goes by without a new outrage from the Tony Abbott government. One recent outrage was when Abbott declared that Australia was “unsettled” before the British invasion — taking us back to the days of terra nullius.

After Commissioner Kenneth Hayne released the banking royal commission’s interim report in September, many of the headlines and takeaway quotes focused on its claim that banks “put profits before people”.

However, any socialist, and probably most people, responded to this by saying: “No shit, Sherlock!”

So Tony Abbott is the new prime minister. The Rudd-Gillard-Rudd Labor governments delivered this outcome with the narrow self-interest of its MPs and mafia-like faction heads and its desperation to prove itself as the best managers for the billionaire class.

Could the royal commission into the banking and financial sectors be the beginning of the end for the Turnbull government? Let's make it so.

Where to start with an analysis of the mining boom in Australia? Perhaps ironically, with the Independent Commission Against Corruption.

The Socialist Alliance candidate for the federal seat of Sydney Peter Boyle, said: “We are totally opposed to the federal and state governments' privatisation of public housing and giving big hand-outs to developers and private landlords from the public purse.

Prime minister Tony Abbott chalked up his first budget win on June 17 when the 2% “levy” on high income earners passed both houses of parliament.

While the NSW Coalition government can spend billions of dollars on rebuilding football stadiums, it says it cannot build 40,000 new public homes to house homeless people.

This is cruel and wrong. Having a certain proportion of the community go without a stable roof over their heads is a visual reminder to housed workers that their situation is precarious, and that they should be “grateful”. 

In response to the announcement by General Motors from its corporate headquarters in Detroit that it will discontinue vehicle and engine manufacturing and significantly reduce its engineering operations in Australia by the end of 2017

The Big Four banks must be nationalised so people can take back their stolen wealth and a new public banking system must be created under democratic community control.

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